Arnold Newman

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Arnold Newman (1918-2006) is remembered as one of the most accomplished portrait photographers of the twentieth century. His ‘environmental portraits’ paved the way for modern portrait photography.

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Works

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Grandma Moses, Eagle Bridge, NY, 1 October 1949

Arnold Newman

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Jackson Pollock, 830 Springs Fireplace Road, Springs, East Hampton, Long Island, NY, February 1949

Arnold Newman

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Pablo Picasso, La Galloise, Vallauris, France, 2 June 1954

Arnold Newman

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Andy Warhol, New York City, 1973

Arnold Newman

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Henry Moore, Much Haddam, London, 1966

Arnold Newman

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Igor Stravinsky, New York, NY, 1 December 1946

Arnold Newman

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Henri Cartier-Bresson, New York, NY, 7 January 1947

Arnold Newman

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Milton Avery, New York, NY, 6 January 1961

Arnold Newman

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Georgia O’Keeffe, Ghost Ranch, Near Abiquiu, NM, 2 August 1968

Arnold Newman

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Marilyn Monroe, Henry Weinstein’s Home, Beverly Hills, CA, 20 January 1962

Arnold Newman

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Igor Stravinsky, New York, NY, 1 December 1946

Arnold Newman

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Yasuo Kuniyoshi, 30 East 14th Street, New York, NY, 20 October 1941

Arnold Newman

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Frank Stella, New York, NY, 19 April 1967

Arnold Newman

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Georges Braque, Varengeville, Normandy, France, 8 October 1956

Arnold Newman

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Isaac Stern, New York, NY, 23 September 1985

Arnold Newman

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Marcel Duchamp, Peggy Guggenheim’s Gallery, Art of this Century, New York, NY, November 1942

Arnold Newman

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Willem De Kooning, 831 Broadway, New York, NY, 25 May 1959

Arnold Newman

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Martha Graham, 316 East 63rd Street, New York, NY, 2 March 1961

Arnold Newman

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Isamu Noguchi, 33 Macdougal Alley, New York, NY, 4 July 1947

Arnold Newman

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David Hare, Provincetown, Cape Cod, MA, 1 September 1952

Arnold Newman

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Man Ray, 2 Bis Rue Férou, Paris, France, 1 May 1960

Arnold Newman

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Jerome Robbins, School of American Ballet, 637 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 7 October 1958

Arnold Newman

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I M Pei, 385 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 23 September 1967

Arnold Newman

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Jean Arp, Buchholz Gallery, 57th Street, New York, NY, 31 January 1949

Arnold Newman

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Henry Miller, 444 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, CA, 17 April 1976

Arnold Newman

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Alfried Krupp, Essen, Germany, 6 July 1963

Arnold Newman

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Piet Mondrian, 353 East 56th Street, New York, NY, 17 January 1942

Arnold Newman

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Violins, Philadelphia, PA, 1941

Arnold Newman

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Truman Capote, 870 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY, 28 June 1977

Arnold Newman

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Dr Jonas Salk, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 25 February 1975

Arnold Newman

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House, West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

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One Way, West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

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West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

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Door, West Palm Beach, FL, 1940

Arnold Newman

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Barbershop Pole, West Palm Beach, FL, 1940

Arnold Newman

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West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

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Mirror, Baltimore, MD, 1939

Arnold Newman

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Porch and Chairs, West Palm Beach, FL, 1940

Arnold Newman

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Shadow of Light Pole, West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

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Warehouse Door, West Palm Beach, FL, 1940

Arnold Newman

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Tree and Wall, Philadelphia, PA, 1941

Arnold Newman

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Junkyard, Philadelphia, PA, 1939

Arnold Newman

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Headscreen and Posing Bench, West Palm Beach, FL, 1941

Arnold Newman

Early Life

Although Newman was born in New York on 3 March 1918, it would be almost 30 years before he made it his permanent home, in 1946. His father ran a dry-goods business, and then became a hotelier, and Newman’s childhood was split between Atlantic City, New Jersey and Miami Beach, Florida. Newman had originally intended to become a painter, and took up a working scholarship at the University of Miami from 1936-1938.

Photographic Career

His career began in 1938 working in chain portrait studios in Philadelphia, Baltimore and West Palm Beach but Newman would also begin experimenting in abstract and documentary photography on his own. After studying and running small photography studios in Philadelphia and Palm Beach, Newman made his entrée into the New York artistic world in the winter of 1941, through the auspices of the Social Realist painter, Raphael Soyer, who not only agreed to be photographed but gave him an introduction to others. In September of that year, having been “discovered” by Beaumont Newhall, curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art and Alfred Stieglitz, Newman’s work was exhibited at the A.D. Gallery alongside photography by Ben Rose.

Soon he was regularly working for Fortune, LIFE, Newsweek, and Harper’s Bazaar, photographing artists in particular. In 1945, he was given his first solo exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art titled Artists Look Like This and by 1946 Newman had opened his first major studio. On occasion, he would work on location, engaging with the sitter’s personality in gradual but thorough ways. Newman made his first trip to Europe in 1954, undertaking a variety of assignments, photographing Alberto Giacometti in Paris, and Pablo Picasso in Vallauris. In 1949, and back in the United States, Newman provided the images of Jackson Pollock for a profile in LIFE magazine, and contributed much to the portrait photographer’s growing fame. In the same year, Newman met and worked with Frank Zachary, who was to become one of the great magazine art directors and editors of his generation. This began a twenty-five year professional relationship, which saw Newman work for Portfolio, Town & Country, and other significant periodicals.

Arnold Newman has been credited with popularising the ‘environmental portrait,’ which places the sitter in surroundings that suit their profession or skill. His famous portrait of Igor Stravinsky, for example, uses the piano to frame, and help define the famous composer. Newman said of his sitters, “it is what they are, not who they are, that fascinates me,” and he made his reputation photographing a wide range of highly influential cultural and political figures of the twentieth century, often in their most telling environments, be it home or work. While commonplace today, this technique was not widely used in the 1930s when Newman was learning his craft. His archive comprises a catalogue of famous figures of the twentieth century film stars, artists, politicians, sports heroes, and more. He photographed artistic icons such as Max Ernst, Piet Mondrian, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Francis Bacon and David Hockney, Newman’s sophisticated eye and technical brilliance won him many fans, and he is remembered today as one of the great American photographers.

Exhibitions and Awards

Arnold Newman was the recipient of numerous awards, including nine honorary doctorates. In 1975, he received the American Society of Magazine Photographers’ Life Achievement in Photography Award and the International Centre of Photography Master of Photography Award in 1999. He has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at major museums such as the Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, the National Portrait Gallery, London and the Corocan Gallery in Washington.

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