Jerry Schatzberg

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During the 1960s, Jerry Schatzberg captured some of the most iconic and intimate portraits of a generation of celebrated figures.

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Works

Jimi Hendrix In Concert, 1967

Jerry Schatzberg

Jimi Hendrix In Concert, 1967

Jerry Schatzberg

Bob Dylan, 1965

Jerry Schatzberg

Bob Dylan, 1965

Jerry Schatzberg

Don’t Make Waves, 1967

Jerry Schatzberg

Edie Sedgwick, Super Star, 1966

Jerry Schatzberg

Bob Dylan, 1965

Jerry Schatzberg

Bob Dylan, 1965

Jerry Schatzberg

Back Seat Romance. 1960

Jerry Schatzberg

Ted Kennedy. 1962

Jerry Schatzberg

Chico Hamilton In Street. 1962

Jerry Schatzberg

New York Film Festival, Roman Polanski. 1962

Jerry Schatzberg

Robert Redford. 1964

Jerry Schatzberg

Dionne Warwick. 1965

Jerry Schatzberg

Edie Sedgwick, Hold Tight. 1966

Jerry Schatzberg

Francis Ford Coppola. 1966

Jerry Schatzberg

Wilson Pickett. 1967

Jerry Schatzberg

Man With Pipe. 1981

Jerry Schatzberg

Footsteps In The Snow. 1973

Jerry Schatzberg

Fish Market. 1958

Jerry Schatzberg

Vogue: Pushing Man In Cab. 1958

Jerry Schatzberg

Anne St Marie: Hat. 1958

Jerry Schatzberg

Four At Gramercy. 1959

Jerry Schatzberg

Faye Dunaway: Legs. 1968

Jerry Schatzberg

Early Years

Born in New York City, on the 26th June,1927 to a Jewish family, Schatzberg grew up in the Bronx. Schatzberg studied at the University of Miami before working as an assistant to the photographer Bill Hepburn. Schatzberg’s fashion photography has been published in Vogue, McCalls, Esquire, Glamour and Life.

Photographic Career

Schatzberg’s portraits are characterised by their narrative quality, combining emotion and understated actions. Schatzberg never gave specific direction to his subjects, giving them free rein to find their own moment, and allow their personality to come through in his shots. He brought the vibrancy of the street life he had witnessed growing up in the Bronx to his work as a studio photographer, aiming to convey movement and life. Schatzberg mixed fashion and street photography in a way that had not previously been seen. He has said “when I first got into fashion, the models were still standing with their feet in a certain pose, their hands in a certain way. I wanted to give them the freedom of really walking, running, of just being real people.” He was aware that most of his subjects were nervous around the photographer’s lens, and would often spend as much time as possible with his sitters before and during the shoot. He photographed the most notable artists and thinkers of the 1960s, from Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol through to Jimi Hendrix, Steve McQueen and Frank Zappa.

Bob Dylan

His most celebrated portraits are those of Bob Dylan, most notably the photographs he took for the cover of Dylan’s celebrated album Blonde on Blonde, which was released in 1966. Schatzberg has said of their relationship: “as a photographic subject, Dylan was the best. You just point the camera at him and things happen. We had a good rapport and he was willing to try anything.” His success with Dylan led Schatzberg to work with many other towering names of popular culture and music, including The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, and Sammy Davis Jr.

Film Career

Schatzberg began working as a film director in the early 1970s, during the renaissance of American cinema. His debut was Puzzle of a Downfall Child in 1970, following it in 1971 with The Panic in Needle Park (Al Pacino’s first starring role), and Scarecrow, 1973, which shared the grand prize at the 1973 Cannes Film Festival. These films focus on the troubled outsiders in American society, drug addicts, criminals and misfits. Rendering an unflinching and raw view of society, these films solidified Schatzberg’s position among the foremost American filmmakers of the 1970s. His films, like his photographs, explore and examine the subtleties of the human spirit. Schatzberg lives and works in New York City.