Lee Friedlander

01

/

03

Works

Galax, Virginia, 1962

Lee Friedlander

Cincinnati, Ohio, 1963

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1974

Lee Friedlander

Statue, New Jersey, 1971

Lee Friedlander

Cactus, Brooklyn Botanical Garden, 1973

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1963

Lee Friedlander

Knoxville, Tennessee, 1971

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1963

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1964

Lee Friedlander

Kansas City, Missouri, 1965

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1965

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1966

Lee Friedlander

New York City, 1968

Lee Friedlander

Hillcrest, New York, 1970

Lee Friedlander

Butte, Montana, 1970

Lee Friedlander

San Diego, California, 1970

Lee Friedlander

Hollywood, California, 1970

Lee Friedlander

Chicago, 1972

Lee Friedlander

Lee Friedlander remains a vital figure in photographic history because of his unique approach to documenting the streets and people of America, predominantly in the 1960s. He has won numerous awards, including the Hasselblad Award, the Guggenheim Fellowship, and the MacArthur Fellowship. His work has been exhibited by major museums including the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Friedlander was born in 1934 in Aberdeen, Washington. He became interested in photography at a young age, and proceeded to study photography at the Art Centre College of Design in Los Angeles. After his studies, Friedlander moved to New York where he freelanced for magazines such as Esquire and Sports Illustrated. He also photographed blues musicians for Atlantic Records, including Duke Ellington and Miles Davis. During this time, Friedlander constantly documented the people and places around him, providing rich historical narratives of what he called the “American social landscape.”

During the 1960s, Friedlander began to focus on street photography. He used a 35-mm camera to produce textural black-and-white photographs in a snapshot style. Though all of his photographs from this period revolve around the metropolis and its inhabitants, buildings and structures, many of these photographs ambiguously feature his own reflections and shadows. Friedlander also used mirroring techniques and fragmentation, which further complicated the subjectivity within his photographs. Innovations such as these have contributed to the “New Documentary” style of photography and have redefined and inspired alternative photographic movements.

The later part of Friedlander’s career culminated in his publication of several photo-books, self-portraits, and a series of photographs focusing on American landscapes. Friedlander still works and lives in New York today.